Tool creates your dream festival line-up based on your Spotify history

Who would perform at YOUR ultimate festival? Instafest tool creates your fantasy line-up based on your Spotify history – here’s how to try it

  • The ‘Instafest’ tool generates your dream festival line-up from your Spotify data
  • It can use your top artists from the last four weeks, the last six months or all time
  • You are given a poster with three hypothetical days of music that you can share

Music fans worldwide are eagerly awaiting the imminent release of Spotify Wrapped, which reveals our most played artists of the year each December.

But to keep us going in the meantime, another tool has been released which is simultaneously getting us excited for the next festival season. 

The tool, called ‘Instafest’, generates your ultimate festival line-up by selecting your top artists from your Spotify listening history.

Created by University of Southern California student Anshay Saboo, it presents your results in a Coachella-style poster with three hypothetical days of music.

Instafest generates your ultimate festival line-up by selecting your top artists based on your listening history


Created by University of Southern California student Anshay Saboo, the tool presents your results in a Coachella-style poster with three days of music

Don’t worry if you’ve been binging Christmas songs recently, as Instafest can use data from the last four weeks, the last six months or all time.

You can also choose the aesthetic of your poster from a Malibu Sunrise, LA Twilight or Mojave Dusk.

The line-up is automatically created with your username at the top, but you can hide this if, for example, you don’t want your weakness for ABBA traced back to you.

To get your line-up, first go to the Instafest website.

Then click on the green ‘Sign in with Spotify’ button, which will take you to the log-in page.

The site will then show you your poster, which you are able to share on social media – if you dare.

One Twitter user said: ‘instafest made me realise my spotify wrapped is going to be a disaster i’m going to log off for a month and rethink my musical choices’

Unfortunately, the third-party service is not yet compatible with Apple Music or other streaming services.

Don’t worry if you’ve been binging Christmas songs recently, as Instafest can use data from the last four weeks, the last six months or all time

Unfortunately, the service is not yet compatible with Apple Music or other streaming services

You can also choose the aesthetic of your poster, or to hide your Spotify username if you don’t want your weakness for ABBA traced back to you

Earlier this month, the British Heart Foundation (BHF) also released a tool that generates a playlist of your favourite tracks that are best to perform CPR to.

The perfect tempo for chest compressions is between 100 and 120 beats per minute, and keeping to this can be made easier by having an appropriate song in your head.

You can create your playlist by visiting lifesavingbeats.com and clicking ‘Login with Spotify’, and also learn how to perform CPR by using the RevivR training tool.

The latter also trains users step-by-step in how to recognise a cardiac arrest and use a defibrillator in just 15 minutes.

Dr Charmaine Griffiths, BHF Chief Executive, said: ‘With over 30,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests every year in the UK and a survival rate of less than one in 10, there is an urgent need for people to learn CPR in an accessible and engaging way. 

‘BHF’s Lifesaving Beats enables thousands of people across the country to do just that.’

Number 1 singles are shorter and slower now than they were 70 years ago, study reveals 

Pop songs are getting shorter, a new analysis has revealed, with the average length of a Number 1 now closer to three minutes than four.

Chart analysts blame the trend on the death of CDs, with streaming services like Spotify and Apple Music turning us away from the turntable.

Artists are foregoing a lengthy intro in favour of getting to a catchy hook that could result in a viral hit, according to chart analyst and historian James Masterton. 

Speaking to MailOnline, he said: ‘The downward trend of song durations is largely attributable to the way producers are targeting tracks at a streaming audience. 

‘Long instrumental introductions are a thing of the past, you have to get to the hook or the meat of the song as soon as possible to ensure people don’t click away.’

Read more here 

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