Twitter tests a new system that lets users 'unmention' themselves

Twitter tests a new system that lets users ‘unmention’ themselves from tweets – allowing people to escape long-winded conversations

  • Users can now remove their name from a post in which they were mentioned
  • It is only available to select users as an experimental feature on the website
  • Using the unmention feature won’t remove the @name from the original tweet
  • It will stop any notifications in relation to the thread or subsequent mentions
  • It isn’t clear when the feature will be available for all users or on mobile devices 

Twitter is testing out a new feature that lets users remove themselves from a post that they have been mentioned in, escaping long-winded and unwanted threads. 

‘Unmention’ has been a widely requested feature among users regularly tagged into tweets, and something the social network has hinted at launching in the past.

It is experimental and limited to users of the Twitter website for now, but could be rolled out to other platforms in the future.

Twitter privacy designer, Dominic Camozzi, first unveiled the concept of an unmention button in July last year, saying ‘sometimes you want to talk, and sometimes you just … don’t.’ 

Twitter is testing out a new feature that lets users remove themselves from a post that they have been mentioned in, escaping long-winded and unwanted threads

It is a period of change for Twitter, including launching a range of features aimed at improving privacy and protection for users.

To use the new feature, when it is rolled out more widely, select ‘leave this conversation’ within the options of a tweet to stop notifications.

The feature is already available for some users, but Twitter says it can’t say when the feature wiill be widely available on the web, or launched on mobile. 

Your name isn’t removed form the Tweet when you remove mentions, just the notifications of updates from that conversation, and your name on follow-up tweets.

Camozzi said: ‘I want to make it easier to untag yourself from a Tweet or conversation you don’t want to be involved in.   

‘Just pick ‘Unmention yourself from this conversation’ from the more info menu and the link to your profile will be removed.’ 

‘Unmention’ has been a widely requested feature among users regularly tagged into tweets, and something the social network has hinted at launching in the past

Another feature around mentions, suggested by Camozzi in July 2021, was the ability to prevent certain users from mentioning you in the future.

‘Going further, if someone you don’t follow @ mentions you, you’ll get a special notification. If you unmention yourself from there, the Tweet author will not be able to mention you again,’ he explained.

It isn’t clear if that aspect is available in the version launched for certain web users. 

The new feature follows a suggestion Twitter is testing an ‘edit’ button, one of the most widely requested features in the more than decade since the service launched.

The firm denies it was pushed into testing the feature by billionaire Elon Musk, who has become the largest single shareholder in the social network.

Elon Musk took to his social media platform Thursday morning to inform his more than 80 million followers that Twitter’s next board meeting was ‘gonna be lit’ by sharing an image of himself smoking a blunt on Joe Rogan’s podcast in 2018.

It is experimental and limited to users of the Twitter website for now, but could be rolled out to other platforms in the future

Tesla CEO Elon Musk tweeted out a poll Monday night asking his followers whether they would like Twitter to have an edit button

The billionaire polled his Twitter followers about the creation of an edit button on Monday, just hours after he filed an SEC disclosure declaring his 9.2 percent stake in the social media platform.  

Twitter CEO Parag Agrawal later responded to the tweet: ‘The consequences of this poll will be important. Please vote carefully,’ apparently trolling Musk for saying the same thing in a March 25 tweet when he questioned whether Twitter ‘adheres to the principle’ of free speech.  

In a tweet on April 1, the Twitter communications department wrote, ‘we are working on an edit button.’ That same day, Musk acquired the final block of his a 9.2% stake in the social media giant, regulatory filings show. 

But many Twitter users had assumed the company’s tweet was an April Fools joke – that is until Musk tweeted a poll to his 80.6 million followers Monday night asking whether the platform should add the edit button. 

‘Now that everyone is asking… yes, we’ve been working on an edit feature since last year!’ the social media giant wrote Tuesday confirming the news.

‘No, we didn’t get the idea from a poll,’ it added, referencing Musk’s post. 

Twitter CONFIRMS it’s working on an edit button but denies that Elon Musk is responsible for its creation – and says it will test it in ‘coming months’ 

Twitter denied Tuesday that it was pushed to begin work on an edit button by Elon Musk, who posted a poll to his page just 24 hours earlier asking if users wanted the feature.

‘Now that everyone is asking… yes, we’ve been working on an edit feature since last year!’ the social media giant wrote.

‘No, we didn’t get the idea from a poll,’ it added, referencing Musk’s post.

The announcement also came as it was revealed Musk bought his final block of shares in the company on the day Twitter first revealed it was working on the feature.

In a tweet on April 1, the Twitter communications department wrote, ‘we are working on an edit button.’ That same day, Musk acquired the final block of his a 9.2% stake in the social media giant, regulatory filings show. 

But many Twitter users had assumed the company’s tweet was an April Fools joke – that is until Musk tweeted a poll to his 80.6 million followers Monday night asking whether the platform should add the edit button.

Twitter CEO Parag Agrawal later responded to the tweet: ‘The consequences of this poll will be important. Please vote carefully,’ apparently trolling Musk for saying the same thing in a March 25 tweet when he questioned whether Twitter ‘adheres to the principle’ of free speech.

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