Heat could kill more people than infectious diseases combined by 2100

Extreme heat from global warming could kill more people than HIV, malaria and yellow fever combined by 2100, study warns

  • Global warming is increasing temperatures and  killing more people globally
  • A study reveals heat could kill 73 people per 100,000 by 2100
  • The fatalities are more than all current infectious diseases combined
  • Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sudan could see 200 deaths per 100,000 by 2100

As the world struggles to combat the coronavirus, researchers come forward with a warning of a deadlier threat – extreme heat.

Temperatures are increasing across the globe due to global warming and could kill more people than the current infectious diseases combined.

The team found that if greenhouse gas emissions are not curbed, heatwaves could kill 73 people per 100,000 by 2100.

This is the same number of fatalities linked to HIV, malaria and yellow fever combined.

Following an investigation into temperature and mortality, the results showed that it is those with underlying cardiovascular issues that are more at risk.

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Temperatures are increasing across the globe due to global warming and could kill more people than the current infectious diseases combined. The team found that if greenhouse gas emissions are not curbed, heatwaves could kill 73 people per 100,000 by 2100

The warning comes from a team of more than 30 scientists at the Climate Impact Lab, who gathered 399 million death records from 41 countries for the study, as reported on by Earther.

The records show that the direct impact of extreme heat, which results in heat stress or heat stroke, only affected a small pieces of deaths linked to rising temperatures.

However, the largest amount of heat-related fatalities were a result of indirect impacts, as heat is known to increase risk of heart attacks among those with cardiovascular issues.

Amir Jina, environmental and development economist at the University of Chicago and co-author of the study, told Earther in an email that when an individual with heart problems is exposed to extreme heat, their ‘body starts pumping more blood around, trying to stay cool and it puts extra stress on the system.’

The team found that if greenhouse gas emissions are not curbed, heatwaves could kill 73 people per 100,000 by 2100. This is the same number of fatalities linked to HIV, malaria and yellow fever combined

As many previous studies have suggests, the current report predicts that populations in the warmest parts of the world will see the highest death tolls.

This includes Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sudan, which could see as many as 200 deaths per 100,000 people.

However, the increased fatalities is not only because these areas are already hot, it is also due to the fact they are poor and cannot afford proper cooling systems.

Jina and his team also predict that if greenhouse gases are not cut, heat-related deaths will cost 3.2 percent of the world’s global economic output by the end of the century.

Through the study, researchers found that one ton of carbon dioxide emitted costs the world $36.60 in damages.

A study released in June also highlighted how deadly extreme temperatures are.

Death records show that hundreds of Americans die from heat each year, but a new investigation reveals it may actually be thousands.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has estimated some 600 people lose their lives to extreme temperatures, but a new study suggests the real amount is more than 5,600.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has estimated some 600 people lose their lives to extreme temperatures, but a new study suggests the real amount is more than 5,600

Researchers used data from the National Center for Health Statistic on deaths in populous areas in the US from 1997 through 2006, along with a model that estimates temperatures in these regions.

The data shows moderate heat killed 3,309 people per year in the counties included in the study, and extreme heat killed 2,299 people each year.

However, as the coronavirus linger across the nation, experts fear these numbers will increase, as publicly accessible air conditioned spaces are now longer available.

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